Tag Archives: sleep

Diabetes: The Scary Truth

It is scary that more than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or pre-diabetes, according to a new report recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4% of the U.S. population – have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have pre-diabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years.

Source: www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p0718-diabetes-report.html


Starting in January Sikorsky Chiropractic will be hosting a monthly health meeting.  Dr. Sikorsky will be your coach and guide you in becoming healthier.  This class will be a safe space where various topics will be covered to improve your overall health.  Each month we will discuss something different at our meeting.  We will include conversation on exercise, diet, sleep, etc. in our meetings.  As January comes near we will provide more information!

Too Much Sedentary Behavior Will Negatively Affect Our Children

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Do you have kids?  Are you thinking of having kids? If you answer yes then this is a great article to read!

It’s so important that we make sure we are taking the right steps to instill good habits in our children’s lives to help them lead a healthy lifestyle into adulthood. On top of a high amount of sedentary behavior among children, 1/3 of children are not getting enough physical activity.  It can change!  Our children will follow the example we set so let’s make it a good one!

 


 

Children who spend more than three-quarters of their time engaging in sedentary behaviour, such as watching TV and sitting at computers, have up to nine times poorer motor coordination than their more active peers, reveals a study published in the American Journal of Human Biology.

The study, involving Portuguese children, found that physical activity alone was not enough to overcome the negative effect of sedentary behavior on basic motor coordination skills such as walking, throwing or catching, which are considered the building blocks of more complex movements.

“Childhood is a critical time for the development of motor coordination skills which are essential for health and well-being,” said lead author Dr. Luis Lopes, from the University of Minho. “We know that sedentary lifestyles have a negative effect on these skills and are associated with decreased fitness, lower self-esteem, decreased academic achievement and increased obesity.”

Dr. Lopes’ team studied 110 girls and 103 boys aged nine to ten from 13 urban elementary schools. The children’s sedentary behavior and physical activity were objectively measured with accelerometers (a small device that children attach to their waist that quantifies movement counts and intensities) over five consecutive days. Motor coordination was evaluated with the KTK test (Körperkoordination Test für Kinder), which includes balance, jumping laterally, hopping on one leg over an obstacle and shifting platforms.

The tests were supplemented with a questionnaire for parents to assess health variables, before the authors compiled the results into three models to calculate odd ratios for predicting motor coordination. These were adjusted for physical activity, accelerometer wear time, waist to height ratio and home variables.

On average the children spent 75.6% of their time being sedentary, but the impact on motor coordination was found to be greater on boys than girls.

Girls who spent 77.3% or more of their time being sedentary were 4 to 5 times less likely to have normal motor coordination than more active girls. However, boys who were sedentary for more than 76% of their time were between 5 to 9 times less likely to have good or normal motor coordination than their active peers.

“It is very clear from our study that a high level of sedentary behavior is an independent predictor of low motor coordination, regardless of physical activity levels and other key factors” said Lopes. “High sedentary behavior had a significant impact on the children’s motor coordination, with boys being more adversely affected than girls.”

Until now there has been little research into the links between sedentary behavior and motor coordination, but these findings reveal that physical activity did not counteract the negative effects that high levels of sedentary behavior had on motor coordination.

“The results demonstrate the importance of setting a maximum time for sedentary behavior, while encouraging children to increase their amount of physical activity,” concluded Lopes. “We hope that our findings will make a valuable contribution to the debate on child health and encourage future investigations on this subject.”

 

Source:
Wiley. “Children who spend three-quarters of their time in sedentary behavior have up to nine times poorer motor coordination than active peers.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120815082723.htm>.
Wiley. (2012, August 15). Children who spend three-quarters of their time in sedentary behavior have up to nine times poorer motor coordination than active peers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 4, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120815082723.htm
Wiley. “Children who spend three-quarters of their time in sedentary behavior have up to nine times poorer motor coordination than active peers.” ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120815082723.htm (accessed November 4, 2017).

Get More Sleep, Get Rid of Chronic Pain

Not getting enough sleep – or not enough quality sleep that leaves you refreshed and ready to take on the day? Instead are you fatigued, irritable and ready to crawl right back into bed? A major health issue could be in your future: chronic pain. In fact, your odds of suffering chronic pain due to poor quality and/or quantity of sleep may increase by a factor of two or three compared to people who experience better sleep.

I have some tips for great sleep hygiene!

  1. Get regular. Go to bed and get up at more or less the same time every day, even on weekends and days off!
  2. Sleep when sleepy. Try to only sleep when you actually feel tired, rather than spending too much time awake in bed.
  3. Get up & try again. If 20 minutes pass and you’re still wide awake, get up and do something calming or boring until you feel sleepy.  Sit quietly somewhere with the lights off to tell your brain it’s time to shut down.
  4. Avoid caffeine & nicotine. Avoid consuming caffeine or nicotine for at least 4-6 hours before going to bed.  These act as stimulants and interfere with the ability to fall asleep.
  5. Avoid alcohol. It’s also best to avoid alcohol 4-6 hour before bed.  It may seem relaxing and helpful but actually interrupts the quality of sleep.
  6. Bed is for sleeping. If you use your bed as a place to watch TV, eat, read, work on your laptop, pay bills, and other things, your body will not learn this connection.
  7. No naps. Avoid taking naps during the day to make sure that you are tired at bedtime.  If you absolutely have to nap make sure it’s before 3pm and less than an hour.
  8. Sleep rituals. It can be helpful to do relaxing stretches or breathing exercises for 15 minutes before bed. Even sitting calmly with a cup of caffeine-free tea can be helpful!
  9. Bathtime. A hot bath 1-2 hours before bed will raise your body temperature causing you to feel sleepy as your body temperature drops again.
  10. No clock-watching. Frequently checking the clock during the night can wake you up and reinforce negative thoughts about sleep time.
  11. Exercise. Regular exercise is a good idea to help with good sleep, but try not to do too much within 4 hours before bedtime.
  12. Eat right. A balance diet will help you sleep well but timing is important.  It’s difficult to go to sleep on an empty stomach so having a light snack may be helpful.
  13. The right space. A cooler room with enough blankets to stay warm is best.  Curtains or an eyemask are great to block out the light as well as earplugs to have complete quiet.
  14. Keep daytime routine the same. Don’t avoid activities because you feel tired.  Try to keep them the same as you had planned making sure to not reinforce insomnia.

Developing these good habits can provide long-term solutions to sleep difficulties.  Of course there are many medications used to treat insomnia, but these tend to only be effective in the short-term.  Ongoing use of these medications may lead to dependence and interfere with developing good sleep habits independent of medications.

Chronic pain isn’t something to mess with, but you don’t have to. Let’s discuss any pain you’re experiencing and don’t forget to mention any sleep issues. Whether poor sleep is causing your pain, or pain is causing poor sleep, I can help determine the cause and correct it. Now that’s called a win-win.

 

 

  • Sources: www.toyourhealth.com/mpacms/tyh/article.php?id=2431

www.cci.health.wa.gov.au